Podcast Episode: A Quickie On Contraception

A guide to female contraception with Smile Makers and Dr Jess

Podcast Episode: A Quickie On Contraception

A guide to female contraception with Smile Makers and Dr Jess

 
 

In this Quickie from our podcast Clitastic Chronicles, we asked Dr Jess from InSync Medical to walk us through the different options vulva owners have when it comes to contraception. To each their own! Listen to her tips to look for yours.

Episode Transcript

Smile Makers , 00:13
Hi everyone, and welcome to Clitastic Chronicles, a pleasure positive podcast created by Smile Makers for people with clitorises. Today I'm speaking with Dr. Jess. Dr. Jess runs a sexual health clinic here in Singapore. A general practitioner by training, she has developed a keen interest in female and sexual health. Her practice offers management of female health issues and bridges the gap between regular GPs and gyneocologists, and sexual health specialists. Today, we're talking about contraception for folks with vulvas. We feel that when it comes to contraception, we are rarely informed on on our choices of how to navigate our options and find the best one for us. That's why we wanted to sit with Dr. J's and expand our horizon on the topic. Let's get started. Hi, guys, thanks for being here with us today. And today we want to talk about contraception. So my first question is for people with vulvas, can you walk us through the different contraception methods that are available, because I feel we always tend to only think of the pill and condoms. So I'd really like to expand our understanding of that,

Dr Jess , 01:30
Sure, Cecile. Look, with contraception, it's like walking into a candy shop, and you've got so much to pick from. And, of course, there is often not one perfect fit for a person. Now, just to run you through a list of things that are available to individuals who have vulvas to pick from when it comes to contraception. Of course, you're very right, this the most famous one is the pill. And even with the pills, there are different types of pills, a myriad of brands, the one thing I really want women to know, when they're taking up taking onboard contraception is, "why are there so many brands?". And that's because there's just not a branding difference. It's because each one of these pills contain a different amount of estrogen. And they all contain about two different hormones. And they also contain a different type of the second hormone called progesterone. And a different amount of estrogen will have different side effects. A different type of progesterone can have different benefits, and different disadvantages. For example, we rely a lot on this second hormone, what is in that second hormone in the pill they are taking to determine whether is this hormone going to help me with cutting back my acne as well as taking the contraceptive pill? Or is this hormone great for my hair issues? Or this whole one are less likely to cause problems with my sex drive and my vaginal dryness? Or is this hormone not going to help me? Is this hormone gonna cause less disturbance to my moods. So it is important to just understand how a hormone or birth control pill is picked for you, and why one might suit you and another won't. So that's that's pills in general, then we've got other options. So some people can't take pills, you know, it's a definite no-no for them. So it doesn't mean you can't take pills, that's the end of your contraception options with as many that are left open for you. So you've got things like injections, so you might go for injections that gets given to you in your arm, just like any regular vaccine. And those injections are sort of taken once every three months. Okay, one of the most cheapest forms of contraception available right now.

Smile Makers , 03:46
So is it also estrogen and progesterone?

Dr Jess , 03:48
So, besides the pills, which are what we call combined oral contraceptive pills, C-O-C-P , which is for combined oral contraceptive pills. And that's why combined is because it's got the two hormones. Now, if you don't go for the pill versions, which are the combined pills, then you're left with other options that all contain only a single hormone. So they contain only the progesterone, zero estrogen. And so this might be great. These options might be great for women who are breastfeeding, because estrogen if you take these generally cuts back the amount of breast milk that you produce, it might be great for women who have migraines, especially the ones with that, the auras, you get the visual warning just before your migraines sets, some people get sparkling visions, exactly, their vision. So those sort of women cannot take history because it truly increases their stroke risk. Not having estrogen in your contraception is also wonderful for women with a history of breast cancers because having the history was a big no-no for them. So they have to then take the other, which have no estrogen. And off which one of the examples of progesterone only contraception is the injections, which we call the Depo injections, the ones that you take every three months.

Smile Makers , 05:13
And so the pill cancels periods is that also the case of injections?

Dr Jess , 05:17
The pills actually do not cancel periods. So if you take the pills, you might notice that there is usually you know, when we think about pills, we think about having period every once every four weeks, yeah, and in the pills, you might have pills that only accommodate for three weeks, then there's no fourth week of pills. So it's an absent week. So to pick, it's a week that you take a break from the pills, and then you will have a period that week. And mind you, these periods are not natural periods, they're also fake periods. It's all controlled by the pills. So if you do the pills, such that you take the three weeks worth of pills, you take a break, you have your period thing, and the moment that one week break is over, you come back on the next packet of the pills. So you do have a period every month. They're not, they're not, they're not your natural periods, they're all controlled by the pills. However, you can take pills in such a way where you skip the break entirely, then you go back to back with your pills is quite safe to do that with modern pills. Because the amount of hormones in there is not quite a lot compared to the ones that were first designed 60 years ago when pills first came out. So now you can do pills back to back and you have wait periods you avoid the unnecessary bleeding, the breakthrough bleeding, stop having the pills. So in that manner, you can skip a period. However, when you are adding, the whole reason why we did this pills this way and have a break, people might ask why they have that break, is it necessary for us to have the break? Why make pills like that? And that's because by nature of how pills were designed, by history of how the pills were designed, it was designed back then when social cultural norms and social cultural pressures were immense. So they didn't want to you know, displease the Pope, displease the church, and they wanted this to be something that we could use without straying far, you know going off tangent with how periods naturally work, you're supposed to get your periods one every month, and let's create something that mimics that status, why you had that break. Back then it might be dangerous to do the break, I mean not do the breaks because the pills weren't, you know, weren't tweaked, like they have been now. These six six decades, we have tweaked pills in such a way we've managed to drop the level of hormones down to such a nice low level that now it's safe to do these pills every day without the outbreak.

Smile Makers , 07:49
And so with the injection, how does that work?

Dr Jess , 07:51
With the injection, you've got no estrogen, you kind of have no break. So you are taking it once every three months, right? So what happens when you have only a single hormone in your contraception device that you're using, whether it's the injection or one of the other devices, which I'll talk about in a short while, is that your body stops making a lining. So, your uterus always has this lining, like a thick lining that is waiting to shed and come out. It's period blood flow. But what happens when you take these, this this progesterone, let's say for example, through an injection, then your body just doesn't make the lining. So my thing to women, I tell them, hey, look, if there is no lining me, what are you waiting to share, there is nothing to be shared, and therefore your periods kind of stop. But you're only relying on one hormone in your body. And that could be moments where these hormone levels just dip in and your body just receives this this unusual signal to Oh, the levels dip. So I'm going to shed a little bit of whatever tiny lighting is letting you might get a little bit of spotting here in there. Okay, so it can be a little bit of an erratic, what we call nuisance bleeding, in the first six months when you are on devices that contain only one hormone in them. So, there are other devices besides the injections. So, we've got implants that go into your arm, okay. And they stay there for about three years and they slowly release the progesterone hormones. Then you've got IUDs, which are intra uterine devices because they live within the uterus. And they're popped in there through a tiny tiny procedure, which can be done literally at the bedside with you completely conscious. And they just live in their uterus for about five years. And they release these hormones very slowly across the five years, and that may confer you contraception. There's one other type of contraception that doesn't involve any hormones, so no combined hormones, no single hormones. It's just it's very primitive. It relies on copper. So these are the copper IUD and these are the devices that have got a copper coil around a little plastic T shaped device. And that is put into your uterus. And the copper simply repels sperm. That's all it does. So it doesn't affect your hormones. It doesn't affect the way you release an egg, it just repels sperms. Okay, so you know, in terms of how good it is to prevent pregnancy, well, they're not as good as hormonal devices, but they're darn good, they're still pretty darn good. So they they're probably about cliche numbers here when a throw at you, but 99.2, 99.6% effective, percent effective. So they're pretty darn good stuff. But they cause heavy bleeding. And they can also cause painful periods. So you might feel that happening. So you already start with heavy period and you get cramping quite a lot.

Smile Makers , 11:01
Okay, but if you have menstrual pain, you can go for the other IUD.

Dr Jess , 11:06
Yes, yeah. Because it's wonderful, right? It's got single hormone in it, and it will eventually stop your periods. So no more periods. A lot of people love that. Okay, so that's, that's wonderful for that. A lot of athletes like it, a lot of very active women like it, a lot of women with period pains, heavy periods like it. In fact, it's used as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding.

Smile Makers , 11:27
Are there other non hormonal contraception besides the condom for the penis?

Dr Jess , 11:34
Yes, so there's condoms for women as well. So I find that they are a little bit cumbersome, because you've got to insert it straight right up into your vagina, cap your cervix, and then the sheet falls down, ah, across your your vagina, just like creating an in total veil in your vagina. So they can, they can be a little bit cumbersome. And women might find that sensations are not as great when it comes to the female condoms. And the female contents haven't quite evolved like the male condoms. You know, you get textured male condoms, you get flavored male condoms. So the texturing allows you to preserve more sensation during sex. But there's no condoms don't quite haven't quite evolved in that manner yet.

Smile Makers , 12:25
My last question on contraception would be what are the questions that we should actually ask ourselves and our gynecologist before choosing our contraception?

Dr Jess , 12:33
Very, very good question, though, because you need to self analyze what is most important for us but but the only way to be able to do that when it comes to choosing a contraception is to understand what are the side effects that we can see from contraception, and what benefits I can milk from a contraception. So common side effects that you might experience with contraception are things like nausea bloatedness, sometimes changes in the skin, so you might get that initial acne, or there could be some mood disturbances or weight gain. So it is then extremely important to highlight what is important for you. So for example, if if you're a woman who has got skin issues, you've got pigmentation issues already, or you've got acne that tends to flare up every now and again, or you're suffering from chronic acne. Then when you when you embark on trying to get a contraception for yourself, the number one priority you need to feature to your doctors is, look, I have got a history of acne. When you do pick something for me please prioritize that, you know, you like a pill that doesn't cause your acne to flare up so much. What in fact, is there a pill that helps improve my acne? If you have, and we talk about moods now, so you know, we don't really know how contraception pills actually affect mood or contraception actually affects mood. We know it can swing either, by the way, it's got two ends of the port, in some people, contraceptive pills, for example, uplift their mood, and other people things these contraceptions really dampen their mood and make them feel very depressed or very volatile. Sometimes they're angry. Sometimes they cry for no good reason. We still don't have a good understanding as to why they're such shifts. You know, in different groups of people, they react very differently. Funnily enough, we use pills to manage premenstrual syndrome, which is PMS, and a lot of women recognize what PMS, PMS is, a lot of us have been through, we will get very moody, you get very upset just before the periods kick in. So, some women have a very severe form of this. And pills are used to manage this, Sometimes IUDs are also used to manage this. So in terms of moods, it's it's a good thing to then highlight it and go, "hey, I've got mood issues in the background. F or example, I have a history of depression". And you might say "when you pick a pill for me, could it be something that doesn't throw that off too much?" And studies have shown that it actually is dependent how the pills reacting is dependent on personality. So, are you an anxious type or are you a worrier, because it tends to trigger a little bit of depressive moods in these individuals, so it's to process these things and ask yourself, "What am I like, personality wise? What am I like, mood wise, you know, how will this affect me? Am I only moody when it comes to certain parts of my cycle? Why am I always this way?" So those are the kind of things you might want to think about before you get into a consult for contraception. I think there's so much information available on the internet, women come in already knowing what pills can do to you, what contraception can do to you. So it makes your consult very valuable if you're coming already knowing what you want to prioritize. Another thing with contraception is that we know contraception can have some impact on sexual function. So for example, contraception can cause more vaginal dryness, or contraception can cause an increased likelihood of things like infections or irritation around the vagina. And sometimes contraception can dip your sex drive, some women feel that quite profoundly, some women have no issues, with it and don't see a difference. And that then helps you and your doctor come up with a plan as to which contraception to pick, because every one of them will have a different impact on sex. So what I hear from you is that even if we have, like we try the first method, we should be open to like switching once we see the side effects for us Exactly. It's very trial and error. So you have to be open that way as you walk into a consult for contraception, because the one that you initially pick in agreement with your doctor, just might not be the right one for you. But you have to be open to the idea and go, okay, didn't work for me. Let's move on and try something. Rather than going, ah, this contraception didn't work and contraception doesn't work for me altogether. So you have to be open to that and be willing to do that trial, until you find the one that works for you, because you will find the one that works for you. But bearing in mind, we've only had 60 years. With contraception, we've got a long way more important terms of perfecting contraception, there isn't a contraception available that has zero side effects. Something's got to give with each one of them. But it's about what suits you best without causing too many effects in you so you'll be willing to try and that's what I tell most of my patients, be willing to try and always take out one box. So don't get too eager and take out like you know so many boxes when you come to the clinic and you get pills. For example, trying one first see how you go on it. If that suits you then fine. If it doesn't suit you, keep your mind open, and try other options.

Smile Makers , 18:22
We hope you enjoyed this episode of Clitastic Chronicles and found snippets of wisdom that you can apply to your own sexual health. If you like this podcast, share it around with your friends and give us a five star review on Apple podcasts or wherever you're getting your podcasts from. This will help us make it easy to find. For more sex positivity, head to our website at SmileMakersCollection.com See you there!

In this Quickie from our podcast Clitastic Chronicles, we asked Dr Jess from InSync Medical to walk us through the different options vulva owners have when it comes to contraception. To each their own! Listen to her tips to look for yours.

Episode Transcript

Smile Makers , 00:13
Hi everyone, and welcome to Clitastic Chronicles, a pleasure positive podcast created by Smile Makers for people with clitorises. Today I'm speaking with Dr. Jess. Dr. Jess runs a sexual health clinic here in Singapore. A general practitioner by training, she has developed a keen interest in female and sexual health. Her practice offers management of female health issues and bridges the gap between regular GPs and gyneocologists, and sexual health specialists. Today, we're talking about contraception for folks with vulvas. We feel that when it comes to contraception, we are rarely informed on on our choices of how to navigate our options and find the best one for us. That's why we wanted to sit with Dr. J's and expand our horizon on the topic. Let's get started. Hi, guys, thanks for being here with us today. And today we want to talk about contraception. So my first question is for people with vulvas, can you walk us through the different contraception methods that are available, because I feel we always tend to only think of the pill and condoms. So I'd really like to expand our understanding of that,

Dr Jess , 01:30
Sure, Cecile. Look, with contraception, it's like walking into a candy shop, and you've got so much to pick from. And, of course, there is often not one perfect fit for a person. Now, just to run you through a list of things that are available to individuals who have vulvas to pick from when it comes to contraception. Of course, you're very right, this the most famous one is the pill. And even with the pills, there are different types of pills, a myriad of brands, the one thing I really want women to know, when they're taking up taking onboard contraception is, "why are there so many brands?". And that's because there's just not a branding difference. It's because each one of these pills contain a different amount of estrogen. And they all contain about two different hormones. And they also contain a different type of the second hormone called progesterone. And a different amount of estrogen will have different side effects. A different type of progesterone can have different benefits, and different disadvantages. For example, we rely a lot on this second hormone, what is in that second hormone in the pill they are taking to determine whether is this hormone going to help me with cutting back my acne as well as taking the contraceptive pill? Or is this hormone great for my hair issues? Or this whole one are less likely to cause problems with my sex drive and my vaginal dryness? Or is this hormone not going to help me? Is this hormone gonna cause less disturbance to my moods. So it is important to just understand how a hormone or birth control pill is picked for you, and why one might suit you and another won't. So that's that's pills in general, then we've got other options. So some people can't take pills, you know, it's a definite no-no for them. So it doesn't mean you can't take pills, that's the end of your contraception options with as many that are left open for you. So you've got things like injections, so you might go for injections that gets given to you in your arm, just like any regular vaccine. And those injections are sort of taken once every three months. Okay, one of the most cheapest forms of contraception available right now.

Smile Makers , 03:46
So is it also estrogen and progesterone?

Dr Jess , 03:48
So, besides the pills, which are what we call combined oral contraceptive pills, C-O-C-P , which is for combined oral contraceptive pills. And that's why combined is because it's got the two hormones. Now, if you don't go for the pill versions, which are the combined pills, then you're left with other options that all contain only a single hormone. So they contain only the progesterone, zero estrogen. And so this might be great. These options might be great for women who are breastfeeding, because estrogen if you take these generally cuts back the amount of breast milk that you produce, it might be great for women who have migraines, especially the ones with that, the auras, you get the visual warning just before your migraines sets, some people get sparkling visions, exactly, their vision. So those sort of women cannot take history because it truly increases their stroke risk. Not having estrogen in your contraception is also wonderful for women with a history of breast cancers because having the history was a big no-no for them. So they have to then take the other, which have no estrogen. And off which one of the examples of progesterone only contraception is the injections, which we call the Depo injections, the ones that you take every three months.

Smile Makers , 05:13
And so the pill cancels periods is that also the case of injections?

Dr Jess , 05:17
The pills actually do not cancel periods. So if you take the pills, you might notice that there is usually you know, when we think about pills, we think about having period every once every four weeks, yeah, and in the pills, you might have pills that only accommodate for three weeks, then there's no fourth week of pills. So it's an absent week. So to pick, it's a week that you take a break from the pills, and then you will have a period that week. And mind you, these periods are not natural periods, they're also fake periods. It's all controlled by the pills. So if you do the pills, such that you take the three weeks worth of pills, you take a break, you have your period thing, and the moment that one week break is over, you come back on the next packet of the pills. So you do have a period every month. They're not, they're not, they're not your natural periods, they're all controlled by the pills. However, you can take pills in such a way where you skip the break entirely, then you go back to back with your pills is quite safe to do that with modern pills. Because the amount of hormones in there is not quite a lot compared to the ones that were first designed 60 years ago when pills first came out. So now you can do pills back to back and you have wait periods you avoid the unnecessary bleeding, the breakthrough bleeding, stop having the pills. So in that manner, you can skip a period. However, when you are adding, the whole reason why we did this pills this way and have a break, people might ask why they have that break, is it necessary for us to have the break? Why make pills like that? And that's because by nature of how pills were designed, by history of how the pills were designed, it was designed back then when social cultural norms and social cultural pressures were immense. So they didn't want to you know, displease the Pope, displease the church, and they wanted this to be something that we could use without straying far, you know going off tangent with how periods naturally work, you're supposed to get your periods one every month, and let's create something that mimics that status, why you had that break. Back then it might be dangerous to do the break, I mean not do the breaks because the pills weren't, you know, weren't tweaked, like they have been now. These six six decades, we have tweaked pills in such a way we've managed to drop the level of hormones down to such a nice low level that now it's safe to do these pills every day without the outbreak.

Smile Makers , 07:49
And so with the injection, how does that work?

Dr Jess , 07:51
With the injection, you've got no estrogen, you kind of have no break. So you are taking it once every three months, right? So what happens when you have only a single hormone in your contraception device that you're using, whether it's the injection or one of the other devices, which I'll talk about in a short while, is that your body stops making a lining. So, your uterus always has this lining, like a thick lining that is waiting to shed and come out. It's period blood flow. But what happens when you take these, this this progesterone, let's say for example, through an injection, then your body just doesn't make the lining. So my thing to women, I tell them, hey, look, if there is no lining me, what are you waiting to share, there is nothing to be shared, and therefore your periods kind of stop. But you're only relying on one hormone in your body. And that could be moments where these hormone levels just dip in and your body just receives this this unusual signal to Oh, the levels dip. So I'm going to shed a little bit of whatever tiny lighting is letting you might get a little bit of spotting here in there. Okay, so it can be a little bit of an erratic, what we call nuisance bleeding, in the first six months when you are on devices that contain only one hormone in them. So, there are other devices besides the injections. So, we've got implants that go into your arm, okay. And they stay there for about three years and they slowly release the progesterone hormones. Then you've got IUDs, which are intra uterine devices because they live within the uterus. And they're popped in there through a tiny tiny procedure, which can be done literally at the bedside with you completely conscious. And they just live in their uterus for about five years. And they release these hormones very slowly across the five years, and that may confer you contraception. There's one other type of contraception that doesn't involve any hormones, so no combined hormones, no single hormones. It's just it's very primitive. It relies on copper. So these are the copper IUD and these are the devices that have got a copper coil around a little plastic T shaped device. And that is put into your uterus. And the copper simply repels sperm. That's all it does. So it doesn't affect your hormones. It doesn't affect the way you release an egg, it just repels sperms. Okay, so you know, in terms of how good it is to prevent pregnancy, well, they're not as good as hormonal devices, but they're darn good, they're still pretty darn good. So they they're probably about cliche numbers here when a throw at you, but 99.2, 99.6% effective, percent effective. So they're pretty darn good stuff. But they cause heavy bleeding. And they can also cause painful periods. So you might feel that happening. So you already start with heavy period and you get cramping quite a lot.

Smile Makers , 11:01
Okay, but if you have menstrual pain, you can go for the other IUD.

Dr Jess , 11:06
Yes, yeah. Because it's wonderful, right? It's got single hormone in it, and it will eventually stop your periods. So no more periods. A lot of people love that. Okay, so that's, that's wonderful for that. A lot of athletes like it, a lot of very active women like it, a lot of women with period pains, heavy periods like it. In fact, it's used as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding.

Smile Makers , 11:27
Are there other non hormonal contraception besides the condom for the penis?

Dr Jess , 11:34
Yes, so there's condoms for women as well. So I find that they are a little bit cumbersome, because you've got to insert it straight right up into your vagina, cap your cervix, and then the sheet falls down, ah, across your your vagina, just like creating an in total veil in your vagina. So they can, they can be a little bit cumbersome. And women might find that sensations are not as great when it comes to the female condoms. And the female contents haven't quite evolved like the male condoms. You know, you get textured male condoms, you get flavored male condoms. So the texturing allows you to preserve more sensation during sex. But there's no condoms don't quite haven't quite evolved in that manner yet.

Smile Makers , 12:25
My last question on contraception would be what are the questions that we should actually ask ourselves and our gynecologist before choosing our contraception?

Dr Jess , 12:33
Very, very good question, though, because you need to self analyze what is most important for us but but the only way to be able to do that when it comes to choosing a contraception is to understand what are the side effects that we can see from contraception, and what benefits I can milk from a contraception. So common side effects that you might experience with contraception are things like nausea bloatedness, sometimes changes in the skin, so you might get that initial acne, or there could be some mood disturbances or weight gain. So it is then extremely important to highlight what is important for you. So for example, if if you're a woman who has got skin issues, you've got pigmentation issues already, or you've got acne that tends to flare up every now and again, or you're suffering from chronic acne. Then when you when you embark on trying to get a contraception for yourself, the number one priority you need to feature to your doctors is, look, I have got a history of acne. When you do pick something for me please prioritize that, you know, you like a pill that doesn't cause your acne to flare up so much. What in fact, is there a pill that helps improve my acne? If you have, and we talk about moods now, so you know, we don't really know how contraception pills actually affect mood or contraception actually affects mood. We know it can swing either, by the way, it's got two ends of the port, in some people, contraceptive pills, for example, uplift their mood, and other people things these contraceptions really dampen their mood and make them feel very depressed or very volatile. Sometimes they're angry. Sometimes they cry for no good reason. We still don't have a good understanding as to why they're such shifts. You know, in different groups of people, they react very differently. Funnily enough, we use pills to manage premenstrual syndrome, which is PMS, and a lot of women recognize what PMS, PMS is, a lot of us have been through, we will get very moody, you get very upset just before the periods kick in. So, some women have a very severe form of this. And pills are used to manage this, Sometimes IUDs are also used to manage this. So in terms of moods, it's it's a good thing to then highlight it and go, "hey, I've got mood issues in the background. F or example, I have a history of depression". And you might say "when you pick a pill for me, could it be something that doesn't throw that off too much?" And studies have shown that it actually is dependent how the pills reacting is dependent on personality. So, are you an anxious type or are you a worrier, because it tends to trigger a little bit of depressive moods in these individuals, so it's to process these things and ask yourself, "What am I like, personality wise? What am I like, mood wise, you know, how will this affect me? Am I only moody when it comes to certain parts of my cycle? Why am I always this way?" So those are the kind of things you might want to think about before you get into a consult for contraception. I think there's so much information available on the internet, women come in already knowing what pills can do to you, what contraception can do to you. So it makes your consult very valuable if you're coming already knowing what you want to prioritize. Another thing with contraception is that we know contraception can have some impact on sexual function. So for example, contraception can cause more vaginal dryness, or contraception can cause an increased likelihood of things like infections or irritation around the vagina. And sometimes contraception can dip your sex drive, some women feel that quite profoundly, some women have no issues, with it and don't see a difference. And that then helps you and your doctor come up with a plan as to which contraception to pick, because every one of them will have a different impact on sex. So what I hear from you is that even if we have, like we try the first method, we should be open to like switching once we see the side effects for us Exactly. It's very trial and error. So you have to be open that way as you walk into a consult for contraception, because the one that you initially pick in agreement with your doctor, just might not be the right one for you. But you have to be open to the idea and go, okay, didn't work for me. Let's move on and try something. Rather than going, ah, this contraception didn't work and contraception doesn't work for me altogether. So you have to be open to that and be willing to do that trial, until you find the one that works for you, because you will find the one that works for you. But bearing in mind, we've only had 60 years. With contraception, we've got a long way more important terms of perfecting contraception, there isn't a contraception available that has zero side effects. Something's got to give with each one of them. But it's about what suits you best without causing too many effects in you so you'll be willing to try and that's what I tell most of my patients, be willing to try and always take out one box. So don't get too eager and take out like you know so many boxes when you come to the clinic and you get pills. For example, trying one first see how you go on it. If that suits you then fine. If it doesn't suit you, keep your mind open, and try other options.

Smile Makers , 18:22
We hope you enjoyed this episode of Clitastic Chronicles and found snippets of wisdom that you can apply to your own sexual health. If you like this podcast, share it around with your friends and give us a five star review on Apple podcasts or wherever you're getting your podcasts from. This will help us make it easy to find. For more sex positivity, head to our website at SmileMakersCollection.com See you there!
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